Dr. Alan Wilton (1953-2011) Prominent Australian Geneticist, Assoc. Professor of the School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences at the University of NSW. Dr. Wilton devoted much of his academic life in studying the ancestry and significance of the dingo in Australia.


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“ The dingo is possibly the oldest breed of dog in the world.”


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“ The pure dingo in Australia could be extinct within 50 years.”


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“ Born 2008 destroyed 2011.”


“..they are the only australian native classed as vermin, how sad that such a noble and loving companion is now regarded as a pest, it is not just cruel but a betrayal of the highest order” Unknown.


“Dingoes have been held in a time capsule since they were brought to Australia 5,000 years ago and since then have been running around the continent,” The Times.


The last pure Dingo populations remaining in coastal Australia are probably in the national parks between the Great Dividing Range and the east coast, and on Fraser Island.” Qld Museum.


The situation was disgusting and an International disgrace. 70% of the 100 to 120 dogs left on the Island were malnourished, the population could be wiped out within years.” Ray Revill. Former Island Ranger.


Dingo Research

 

STATEMENT by Dr. Ernest Healy…

The dingo is an ancient (pre-neolithic – pre-agricultural) domesticate (in my view sem-domesticate). Therefore, the position underpinning the Fraser Island Dingo Management Strategy (FIDMS) that the dingo is a wild animal, cannot be allowed any contact with humans and must be forced to live in the wild without assistance, is based on a misconceived understanding of the nature of the animal.

The dingo is unique in being both wildlife and the direct descendant of the world’s first domesticated animal. As such it is a unique part of all human cultural and wildlife heritage. Therefore there is no inconsistency in seeing the dingo as wildlife, while accepting the need to afford it human support/management in settings like Fraser Island….

Dr. Ernest Healy.

Senior Research Fellow, Monash University. President, Dingo Care Newtwork.

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SFID Inc. SUBMISSION: Review of the Fraser Island Dingo Management Strategy.           Fraser Island is an important part of Australia’s cultural and natural heritage. The Fraser Island dingo has been an integral part of this environment and lived with the indigenous Butchulla people for thousands of years, long before European settlement. It is considered one of the last pure strains of dingo remaining on the Eastern Coast.            READ SFID Inc  SUBMISSION.

A research paper published by CSIRO suggests that past and continual destruction of dingoes on Fraser Island could be contributing to the instability of the family group and exacerbating human-dingo conflict. ..

‘Managing dingoes on Fraser Island: culling, conflict and an alternative.’    click here  to read…

REVISED FRASER ISLAND DINGO MANAGEMENT STRATEGY (FIDCRMS) released by the State Government. CLICK HERE.

FINAL REPORT OF THE FRASER ISLAND DINGO MANAGEMENT STRATEGY REVIEW by ECOSURE  CLICK HERE.

STEERING COMMITTEE REPORT OF THE FRASER ISLAND DINGO MANAGEMENT STRATEGY.  CLICK HERE.

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An updated description of the Australian dingo (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793)

Discussion on the Fraser Island Dingo by Dr. Ian Gunn.

Critical comments by Dr. Ernest Healy on the Fraser Island Dingo population study.

Evolution of the Dingo. Wilton, Savolainen and Assoc.

Bringing the Dingo Home. Merryl Ann Parker.

The Impact of Lethal Control on the social stability of a top-order predator. Wallach, Ritchie, Read and O’Neill.

DINGO DIET and PREY availability on Fraser Island. Dafna Camila Angel-E.

THE DINGO’S ROLE REVITALISED. Ecos-Feb-Mar 2009.  Dingoes naturally kept foxes and cats  in check but once dingoes were removed from large tracts of the country these feral predators wreaked havoc in the landscape..

Tracking collar courtesy DERM From May to July  2011, at a cost of  $70,000,  18 dingoes had  GPS tracking collars attached to better understand their  population dynamics and behaviour.  2 dingoes were killed by vehicles, I died of hyperthermia after being trapped, 1 was destroyed by QPWS rangers and 2 died of unknown causes. Therefore the study was evaluated on the results of tracking 12 dingoes. These are the findings. CLICK TO READ.  You be the judge, do the results justify the cost involved and the interference to the animals?

 

 REPORT: Discussions and Recommendations for Fraser Island

 

Experts refute claims by QPWS that ear tagging Fraser Island dingoes has no impact. 
Emeritus Professor, Michael Bryden, from the  Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney, states the following, ‘ It is with alarm I learned of the practice of tagging the ears of dingoes on Fraser Island.
Apart from the obvious animal welfare concerns..it is indefensible in scientific terms..dingoes are predators and the sense of hearing is critical to predatory success..a tag large enough to recognise an individual from a distance must interfere with the mobility of the ear….the fact that in some cases damage to the ear cartilage causes major distortion makes the situation significantly worse.’  READ MORE..

TAGGING: Investigators have an obligation to identify and assess the consequences of their research activities on wild animals, populations and the environment….Investigators should always weigh potential gain in knowledge against the negative consequences of disturbance….animals should not be exposed to excessive or inappropriate handling, conspecific aggression, predation, temperature extremes or undue suffering. READ MORE

Hazing (a.k.a. Harassment) is a process where you disturb the animal’s sense of security to such an extent that it decides to move on. However, it should be noted that Fraser Island is an Island, therefore there is a very limited amount of land or territory for the hazed or harassed dingoes to “move on to”. To work effectively and with the smallest amount of consequences, hazing is supposed to be concentrated and focus on an animal that is causing a serious problem. Failure to concentrate the harassment or hazing technique simply makes the animals get used to the harassment or hazing because the harassment is everywhere. READ MORE

HISTORY OF FRASER ISLAND by Pat O’Brien.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the Fraser Island Dingo is considered “vulnerable”  this means it is in danger of extinction in the wild.

LETTERS SENT TO GOVERNMENT AND OTHER BODIES…

OPEN LETTER to the Minister for the Environment.

LETTER re COLLARS.

Incident at Eurong.

Legal letter re fishers feeding dingo.

Reply to letter sent by QPWS re Easter Incident 2011 resulting in the destruction of 2 dingoes.

Letter to Anna Bligh.

Reply to a pro forma letter from the Premier 25 July 2011.

First Letter to UNESCO.

Follow up letter to UNESCO.

Petition sent to Government.

Info sent to a Foundation.